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A Great FanFest Experience, Thanks to Trevor Hoffman 

The 2012 Padres Fanfest was a great event, it was the third time I had gone and it gets better every year. But for me going this year and experiencing the things I did hit me on a much more personal level.
For those that don’t know there was a special autograph session with Trevor and Glenn Hoffman, only season ticket holders and people who preregistered had the chance to get vouchers for their autographs. The day of the event there was also a twitter trivia contest for another 50 people to win the opportunity.
Despite my parents being season ticket holders and my preregestering we didn’t get the voutures, but, being a saevy social media college student, I was determined to win and have me and my dad get the Hoffmans autographs.
The trivia question was, what was Trevors career high strikeouts in a single season and in what inning did he get most of those strikeouts? Go to that section and row in the park.
My fingers quickly navigated through my iPhone and arrived at the anwser 111 K’s (twice in 1997 and 1998) most of witch in the ninth inning (Section 111, Row 9).
I then ran across half the concourse with my 60-year-old dad in tow, who had no idea what was going on and why I was weaving through the crowd frantically waiving at him to keep up.
We end up making it there and getting the voutures.
Back in 2010 I was an intern in the Sports Department at KUSI-TV. One of the cool things I got to do was go to a few Padres games as a member of the media and help the cameraman get some quotes, basically I was a 6’4″ microphone stand.
The second time I was sent down was when the Brewers were in town (on 4/29/10). This was when Trevor was mightly struggling and had just lost the closers job to John Axford before he had 600 saves.
The cameraman and myself were tasked with getting some quotes from Trevor. As a 18 year old zit faced, snot nosed high school kid who was just a two years into being a journalist I had zero business being in the same room as Trevor, let alone essentially a one on one interview.
For the record I only asked one question, after that my brain completely shut down after I was standing just a few feet away from the baseball player I idolized for many years.
Good thing the cameraman knew what he was doing and picked up the slack and Trevor talked with us for about 10 minutes.
At the end I said thanks, shook his hand and he went on his was to cementing his place in the Hall of Fame.
As a fan, a journalist, and an admirer of the man, him standing around for 10 minutes told me all I need to know about him as a person, the fact that he is a great person and a stand up guy, along with any other clique appliciable.
Here is a Hall of Fame pitcher playing terribly, just lost his job and here comes me, an 18 year old high school senior asking him questions. He had every right to say no, and frankly I was scared out of my mind he would. But yet he said yes, anwsered all of our questions and gave great anwsers.
As a young aspring journalist it meant a lot to me that a Hall of Fame player would stick around and anwser questions, it gave me hope that if I could ask a major league ball player a question I could handle anything, it gave me hope that one day when I am a beat writer for a pro team there are players are like he is.
I can remember the interview vividally, I thought he was rather short compared to what he looked like on the television, his hair was slicked back, his trademark beard was neatly groomed, he was wearing a cut up muscle shirt and had suprisingly buff and chisled arms.
From that day on I wanted to have the opportunity to thank him, because that was a huge moment for me in my very young journalism career.
Fast forward back to the Fan Fest.
I really wanted to tell him the story and thank him, but I was super nervous, becuase you know, HE’S A FUTURE HALL OF FAMER and has the second most saves IN THE HISTORY OF MLB.
As he is signing my Padres jersey I bulurt out how I want to thank him and tell him the story of me first meeting him.
He says thank you a few times and when I finish he said “thanks, that means a lot.” And not just in a “oh, whatever only another hour of signing stuff for these people,” it was a genuine “thanks, that means a lot.”
THEN, he looks up as he hands me the jersey and asks, “so, are you still doing it?”
WHAT.
He listened to EVERY WORD I SAID, from the start where I said I was an intern at a T.V. station to the end where I said it meant a lot to me that he took the time to talk to a young journalist even though he was essentially failing at his job.
That confirmed to me that there was no doubt Trevor is every bit a great man people say he is. He is genuine, he cares, and he is a fantastic person on and off the baseball field.
From now until I die I will never forget the interview and the interaction with the future Hall of Famer Trevor Hoffman.
He is a true hero.
Hoffman_SignatureThe 2012 Padres Fanfest was a great event, it was the third time I had gone and it gets better every year. But for me going this year and experiencing the things I did hit me on a much more personal level.
For those that don’t know there was a special autograph session with Trevor and Glenn Hoffman, only season ticket holders and people who preregistered had the chance to get vouchers for their autographs. The day of the event there was also a twitter trivia contest for another 50 people to win the opportunity.
Despite my parents being season ticket holders and my preregistering we didn’t get the vouchers, but, being a savvy social media college student, I was determined to win and have me and my dad get the Hoffmans autographs.
The trivia question was, what was Trevor’s career high strikeouts in a single season and in what inning did he get most of those strikeouts? Go to that section and row in the park.
My fingers quickly navigated through my iPhone and arrived at the answer 111 K’s (twice in 1997 and 1998) most of witch in the ninth inning (Section 111, Row 9).
I then ran across half the concourse with my 60-year-old dad in tow, who had no idea what was going on and why I was weaving through the crowd frantically waiving at him to keep up.

We end up making it there and getting the voutures.
Back in 2010 I was an intern in the Sports Department at KUSI-TV. One of the cool things I got to do was go to a few Padres games as a member of the media and help the cameraman get some quotes, basically I was a 6’4″ microphone stand.
The second time I was sent down was when the Brewers were in town (on 4/29/10). This was when Trevor was mighty struggling and had just lost the closers job to John Axford before he had 600 saves.
The cameraman and myself were tasked with getting some quotes from Trevor. As a 18 year old zit faced, snot nosed high school kid who was just a two years into being a journalist I had zero business being in the same room as Trevor, let alone essentially a one on one interview.
For the record I only asked one question, after that my brain completely shut down after I was standing just a few feet away from the baseball player I idolized for many years.
Good thing the cameraman knew what he was doing and picked up the slack and Trevor talked with us for about 10 minutes.
At the end I said thanks, shook his hand and he went on his way to cementing his place in the Hall of Fame.
As a fan, a journalist, and an admirer of the man, him standing around for 10 minutes told me all I need to know about him as a person, the fact that he is a great person and a stand up guy, along with any other clique appliciable.
Here is a Hall of Fame pitcher playing terribly, just lost his job and here comes me, an 18 year old high school senior asking him questions. He had every right to say no, and frankly I was scared out of my mind he would. But yet he said yes, answered all of our questions and gave great answers.
As a young aspring journalist it meant a lot to me that a Hall of Fame player would stick around and anwser questions, it gave me hope that if I could ask a major league ball player a question I could handle anything.

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